7.02.2014

The Ultimate Things to Bring Checklist for Trekking Philippines



What are the things to bring when going on a trek? What is too much? What gears should I buy in advance? Should I pack everything?

Once in your  life you have asked these questions when you were invited to go on mountaineering, trekking, or tramping. I'm no expert on this matter, but here's my personal checklist whenever I'm going an overnight trekking.





SHELTER AND CLOTHINGUSE
Tent

Sleeping Bag

Earthpad
Your main shelter while on camp. Many different kinds are available on malls and outdoor shop. The main criteria to look for a good tent are: waterproofing, aero dynamics, durability. Ground sheet are use to protect your tent from abrasion on the ground.

Sleeping bag and Earthpads are used as your bed inside the tent, but really unnecessary if the ground are flat.

BackpackBackpack is essential in mountaineering as you will be storing all your stuff here. 40L technical pack is recommended but a normal backpack will do as well. Backpack enable you to free your hands so you can utilize them during steep ascent. Waterproofing your bag is the first line of defense against rainfall.

Extra Clothes [3 Sets]

Swimwear *
Except for the one you’re already wearing upon ascent, we recommend bringing 3 sets of clothes. 1 set of sleepwear on camp, 1 set you wear going down, and another set to wear after the climb. Just always put in mind to minimize the weight of your pack.

*In places that swimming to falls or river is an option, another set of swimwear is ideal to bring.
Jacket/Sweater
Raincoat

It gets really cold and windy at night that’s why jacket and sweater are recommended. Raincoats are great defense against rainfall.
Trekking Shoes/Sandals

Slippers*
Proper sandals or shoes is a must to avoid slip and fall. Trekking shoes or sandals are suggested, but shoes with good grip and rough sole can also be used.

*I always bring extra slippers so I'll feel comfortable in the camp. This is optional.

Sun Protection:
Sunglasses, Cap, Sunblock
Sunglasses, sun screen, caps can be used to protect self from direct sunlight. Headwear is a versatile bandana like cloth that can be used in many ways.

Compression Pants/Sleeves


Tights, arm sleeves
Tights and long sleeves could be worn to protect skin from thorns, dirt, insect bite and direct sunlight.

A specialize compression pants or sleeves add support to your working muscles.




FOOD AND PREPERATIONUSE

Drinking WaterIn general, 1 liter of drinking water can last for two hours on mild to moderate trails. If there is a potable water source on the trail you can refill your water bottle, but if you prefer to only drink mineral water, bringing a minimum of 2L is good enough. An additional of at least 1L for cooking and cleaning needs is advised.

Trail Food:
Jelly, Nuts, Candies
Trekking is exhausting and bringing trail foods such as candies, dried fruits, nuts, etc. to replenish energy while on trail is recommended.

MealsIt is a tradition and part of the experience to share food within a group. Cooking food on camp has been a ritual as well, but bringing prepared food is also ideal. So bring what you can and share it with others.

Stove
Cooking Utensils
Knife/Swiss Knife
One or two per group will do. Portable stoves powered by butane gas are commonly preferred by most mountaineers. Portable cookset are enough to cater small group while bigger frying pan and kaldero may be needed for large number of group.For preparing meals. Protable foldable knife and swiss knife are commonly favored.

Eating Utensils

Food container, Spoon, Fork, Spork, Etc.
Tupperware or other food container is advised while disposable paper plates are discouraged to minimize trash.Bringing of spoon and fork, swiss knife or any other utensil is favorable.


After MealWet wipes, wet tissue with alcohol can be used to clean your utensils.



TOILETRIES AND WASTE DISPOSAL

USE

TrowelWe dispose our waste with cathole latrine procedure. We uses trowel to dig a hole and we cover it with soil after. We do it far from the campsite. Refer to waste management concern for further information.

Wetwipes, AlcoholComes in handy with the trowel in waste disposal. Can also be used to clean self and utensils.
Garbage BagTo dispose garbage.

Personal ToiletriesShampoo, soap, and bath towel may not come in handy while on mountain but an after hike bath on base camp is very rewarding.







EMERGENCY, MISC


Headlamps, flashlightIs a must as they are your source of light during night. Headlamp price ranges from P150 –P1000.Flashlight will do as well.

First Aid Kit and personal prescribed medicationOne per group will do. Medical use.Must at least include the following:Elastic Bandage - For immobilizing sprained body part.Sling, handkerchief - Use to support for sprain or fracture.Gauze, Micropore, Bandage Scissors - For dressing wound.Iodine Povidone (Betadine) - For  disinfecting wounds.

Alcohol - For hand disinfection.

Paracetamol 500mg - For fever.

Mefenamic Acid - For pain

Loratidine - For allergy

ID*This is optional but I always make sure I bring one on my backpack. No ID No Entry.

Match, Lighter*Starting a fire in mountain is prohibited, but you never know when they may come in handy. Optional

Insect RepellantOff Lotion

Gadgets:

Camera, Powerbank, GPS
For taking pictures. Mobile phones can now act as both camera and GPS device. Just make sure to bring spare batteries or Powerbank.
Make sure to waterproof them as well.



As a general rule the weight of the bag must not exceed 30% of your total body weight.
In loading stuff inside your bag some helpful tips you may consider are:

  1. Heavier stuff at the middle,closest to your body, while lighter stuff on top and bottom. The heavier the top part of the bag is, the higher chance of getting out of balance.

  2. Items that are seldomly used are placed below, while medkits, and money needs to be placed on more accessible side.

  3. Waterproof your clothing. Use a mother bag or a dry bag to water proof clothing, You can wrap them on ice plastic, as this will save a lot of space.

  4. Use earth pad, tents, or the poles to frame you backpack.

  5. Balance heavy stuff in the center of the bag.



Disclaimer: I'm no expert in this matter, so if you have any suggestion or reaction to add or remove on my checklist. Fell free to comment and we'll make the list better.

3 comments:

  1. Thanks for this information. This will be a great help.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for this information. This will be a great help.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Good to be of great help, Luke. We will be updating this soon as well.

    ReplyDelete